WE WANT TO SHARE OUR PASSION WITH YOU

Often the history, nuances and traditions are lost in products we buy from corporations and big companies.

Often, the price tag and name are the only original thing left of a wine.

At Marinic, we are different.

We work in a tradition of a shared passion for what we are doing.
And that is why we produce wines sustainably, personal and easily approachable for both the expert sommelier and the amateur searching for an entry into great wines.

We are always happy and honoured to receive your feedback, comments, photos and stories.
It helps us to make sure that buying wines online is intimate,  and fun!

This is the passion we thrive to share, while protecting the natural habitat, among the most ancient wine-growing regions of the world.

AN IDEA BECAME REALITY

We invited a team of national and international wine experts and lovers  to share their knowledge and experience in oenology and explore some hidden gems of these historical hills where the Romans and later French nobles grew their best wine. 

 

ANTHONY COLAS
French Oenologist (Winemaker)
expert for the development of Classic French wines in Bourgogne and our “Director of Taste”

CRISITIANO VISINTINI 
Italian barrel maker  
our supplier and special advisor in finding the best wood for each wine

STEFANO COSMA 
Slovenian Wine Historian & Journalist
Guiding us in our search for the untold stories and roots of  winemaking in our region

It takes a lot of experience and knowledge to cultivate, maintain and produce wine in this region with its characteristic micro-climate. These wines are made with ancient techniques whose process requires a lot more attention than modern bulk production.
There are many testimonials given in history about this region, not only in the neighbouring countries like Italy but whole over Europe. The region was known for its characteristics in cultivating fruits and especially wine serving high quality produce to cities like Vienna, Prague, Budapest, being discovered by wine-drinkers in London and Paris in later years.

FRENCH GRAPES

Apart from these antic sort of grapes the region developed in its own way of cultivating famous grapes such as Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Cabernet Sauvignon in the last 150-200 years. 

In the 18th century the French king was amazed by the region of Brda, bough land there and started cultivating French grapes. The daughter of Napoleon which cultivated typical French sorts like Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris followed this idea and made these original French grapes familiar with winegrowers throughout the region of Brda. The French grapes adapted to the microclimate of Brda easily because they found the same habitat of the famous French terroir making the new grapes a staple crop and typical plant for more than 150+ years.

ANTIC GRAPES

 We are focused on acting as a plant museum for original type of grapes famous for the region such as Ribolla Gialla and Malvasia with a history believed to be more than 2500 years. 

It is good to know the story behind the products we are buying.

It is good to know where it is from, how it was grown and how it will impact our health and the environment 

..and it is not just what is on your plate but what is in your glass 

WHAT Does "Sustainable" and "low-intervention" mean?

No synthetic pesticides -> natural pest control means a cleaner wine 

No synthetic fertilisers -> grapes are grown naturally and more healthy 

Grapes harvested by hand -> no stems and leafs in the wine

No added sugar -> no headache the next day 

No GMO ingrediens or grapes -> keeping our vines the way they are 

Low sulfites -> less side-effects  

High naturally occurring Antioxidants -> getting the best our of the grapes

Low intervention -> Working with nature rather than against it 

Our wine are made by real farmers and people who are passionate about wine. 
We refuse to use any industrial mass-production agricultural methods. 

That’s better for all of us: you, the wine-lover, us, the farmers and our environment and nature. 

 

SOIL & ELEVATION


We are gifted by having the treasure of the oldest terroirs which we conserve against erosion as we understand this is an important part of our collective farming heritage.

The special exposition to the sun, combined with the elevation of the hills and the distance to the sea bringing a cool breeze is unique in this region making it distinctly more suitable for great wines compared to other regions like Frioli in the neighbouring country Italy.

NO OUTSOURCING

From modelling the terraces, to planting, curating and harvesting the plants – then making the wine in our cave, bottling the wines, labelling and packaging the bottles.

With this central approach we can make sure we have the full control over the whole production to keep the high purity and quality of our wines.

Our expertise in wine-making and cultivating reaches back for many decades and we are always improving our methods while innovating our antic techniques characteristic for this region.

MILLESIME 2018

This was a perfect, rare, year which only comes along once a decade.
An ample amount of water, sun and wind (Bora) all contributed to the quality of this vintage. Winter 2017-18 was moderately cold with temperatures below freezing in the morning but quickly turning positive in the afternoon. These cool temperatures are accompanied by constant ventilation from the Bora wind, coming from the north.

March is also a bit cool and nature slumbers to wake up. Then the weather warms abruptly in the first days of April. In three weeks the entire Brda and Vipava vineyard is adorned with a light green veil. Like pupae, the buds in their cotton transform: green tip, out of the leaves and first leaves spread. The development is so rapid that we are hoping for some cooling to slow down the vine a little. The good news is that the rains are abundant in May and especially in June. 

At the beginning of June, the flower passes quickly in dry conditions very favourable for the development of the clusters. The water tables are at the highest and thanks to the heat the grapes develop in exceptionally favourable conditions.

It is already very hot byt the end of June and temperatures between June 26 and the end of August often peak well above seasonal norms with temperatures exceeding 30° almost daily, interrupted only by a good rain on August 14 coming to cool the soils and gorge berries.

MILLESIME 2019

A vintage is only successful if it has been worked with care and attention into the vine.
Fortunately, some vintages, not evident in the vineyard and bringing all the know-how of the winemaker, are revealed once in the cellar like vintages full of promise. The 2019 vintage is one of them.

After a particularly short winter, February and March are almost springtime, dry, with even a record heat for the season on February 27th. The vines record nature’s message, wake up early and start growing. The season resumes its rights from April 5 with a first morning frost followed by four other frost episodes which will last until May 7.

The summer of 2019
is one of the hottest known to date with two heat waves: one in late June and the other in late July. We will exceed 40 ° C in some places and signs of roasting appear in the vine.

“When trying these wines you have to acknowledge that you can’t get this quality when using machines and chemicals.
These wines are honest, pure, clear.”
Veit Heinichen 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

THE FRENCH NOBLES AND THE COLLIO

A LONG HISTORY OF LOVE (AND VINEYARD)

The love of the French for the Collio Gorizia and for its wines has ancient roots, when it was one with the Goriska Brda. Perhaps it stems from the desire to unite two territories, as Lodovico Bertoli does in 1747, affirming in his “The vineyards and the wine of Burgundy in Friuli” that Pinot noir is none other than Refosco. In 1881, the consul of Portugal even wrote that sparkling Prosecco from the Trieste coast “a beaucoup d’analogie avec le vin de Champagne” (a lot of similarity with wines from the Champagne region)!

But it is with the French Revolution that the first exiles arrive, such as Albert-François de Moré, count de Pontgibaud, who in 1791 settled in Trieste with the pseudonym of Giuseppe Labrosse, then acquiring vast agricultural properties in the county of Gorizia, near Ronchi . 

So it will be Napoleon’s sister, Elisa Baciocchi, to own an estate in Villa Vicentina, where wine is still produced today, and in Canale (today Kanal in Slovenia) near Gorizia. 

The latter was purchased by Duke de Blacas d’Aulps (1771-1839), gentleman of Charles X’s chamber, who arrived in Gorizia in 1836 and was buried with him at the convent of Castagnavizza: the so-called «Saint-Denis de l ‘ exil », also today in Slovenia. 

His son, Louis of Blacas, will also own a winery for decades in Castel San Mauro, downstream of Oslavia, with the vineyards overlooking the Isonzo. But certainly the best known and most cited French winemaker transplanted to the Collio is Count Teodoro La Tour en Voivre, who in 1868 married the Gorizia Elvina Ritter de Zahony and built what we know as “Villa Russiz”. 

He will bring the French vines to Friuli and collect prizes, diplomas and medals for his wines. In 1888, at a fair, brings in tasting Riesling, Traminer, Franconia, Burgundy red, Bordeaux red and Cabernet SauvignonToday it is the young viscount Charles-Louis de Noüe who has fallen in love with the Goriska Brda to produce wines with Alis Marinic in Vedrijan, a place included among the best for his wine vocation already in 1787, not far from the Dobrovo castle, which he labeled in 1880 the bottles Château Dobra.

Original article published on Winestopandgo.com 

Stefano Cosma

Stefano Cosma

Wine Historian
renowned expert and speaker
for the Collio region in Italy and Slovenia

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

THE FRENCH NOBLES AND THE COLLIO

A LONG HISTORY OF LOVE (AND VINEYARD)

The love of the French for the Collio Gorizia and for its wines has ancient roots, when it was one with the Goriska Brda. Perhaps it stems from the desire to unite two territories, as Lodovico Bertoli does in 1747, affirming in his “The vineyards and the wine of Burgundy in Friuli” that Pinot noir is none other than Refosco. In 1881, the consul of Portugal even wrote that sparkling Prosecco from the Trieste coast “a beaucoup d’analogie avec le vin de Champagne” (a lot of similarity with wines from the Champagne region)!

But it is with the French Revolution that the first exiles arrive, such as Albert-François de Moré, count de Pontgibaud, who in 1791 settled in Trieste with the pseudonym of Giuseppe Labrosse, then acquiring vast agricultural properties in the county of Gorizia, near Ronchi . 

So it will be Napoleon’s sister, Elisa Baciocchi, to own an estate in Villa Vicentina, where wine is still produced today, and in Canale (today Kanal in Slovenia) near Gorizia. 

The latter was purchased by Duke de Blacas d’Aulps (1771-1839), gentleman of Charles X’s chamber, who arrived in Gorizia in 1836 and was buried with him at the convent of Castagnavizza: the so-called «Saint-Denis de l ‘ exil », also today in Slovenia. 

His son, Louis of Blacas, will also own a winery for decades in Castel San Mauro, downstream of Oslavia, with the vineyards overlooking the Isonzo. But certainly the best known and most cited French winemaker transplanted to the Collio is Count Teodoro La Tour en Voivre, who in 1868 married the Gorizia Elvina Ritter de Zahony and built what we know as “Villa Russiz”. 

He will bring the French vines to Friuli and collect prizes, diplomas and medals for his wines. In 1888, at a fair, brings in tasting Riesling, Traminer, Franconia, Burgundy red, Bordeaux red and Cabernet SauvignonToday it is the young viscount Charles-Louis de Noüe who has fallen in love with the Goriska Brda to produce wines with Alis Marinic in Vedrijan, a place included among the best for his wine vocation already in 1787, not far from the Dobrovo castle, which he labeled in 1880 the bottles Château Dobra.

Original article published on Winestopandgo.com 

Stefano Cosma

Stefano Cosma

Wine Historian
renowned expert and speaker
for the Collio region in Italy and Slovenia

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